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Pasw Statistics 18 Download Free Crack Files


Whether you're a professional in the statistics sector, or you are just starting to study in this field, the use of this kind of application is highly advisable. To help you to start using this application, PASW includes several tutorials and example files.




Pasw Statistics 18 Download Free Crack Files


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Additionally a "macro" language can be used to write command language subroutines. A Python programmability extension can access the information in the data dictionary and data and dynamically build command syntax programs. The Python programmability extension, introduced in SPSS 14, replaced the less functional SAX Basic "scripts" for most purposes, although SaxBasic remains available. In addition, the Python extension allows SPSS to run any of the statistics in the free software package R. From version 14 onwards, SPSS can be driven externally by a Python or a VB.NET program using supplied "plug-ins". (From Version 20 onwards, these two scripting facilities, as well as many scripts, are included on the installation media and are normally installed by default.)


SPSS Statistics can read and write data from ASCII text files (including hierarchical files), other statistics packages, spreadsheets and databases. SPSS Statistics can read and write to external relational database tables via ODBC and SQL.


This survey of 12th-grade students is part of a series that\nexplores changes in important values, behaviors, and lifestyle orientations of\ncontemporary American youth. Students are randomly assigned to complete one of\nsix questionnaires, each with a different subset of topical questions, but all\ncontaining a set of \"core\" questions on demographics and drug use.\nThere are about 1,400 variables across the questionnaires. Drugs covered by\nthis survey include tobacco, smokeless tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, hashish,\nprescription medications, over-the-counter medications, LSD, hallucinogens,\namphetamines (stimulants), Ritalin (methylphenidate), barbiturates (tranquilizers), cocaine, crack cocaine, GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate), ecstasy, methamphetamine, and heroin. Other topics include attitudes\ntoward religion, changing roles for women, educational aspirations,\nself-esteem, exposure to drug education, and violence and crime (both in and\nout of school).\nHighlights for 2020:\n\nAll students recorded their survey answers on tablets that the project brought to the schools, preloaded with the MTF surveys.\nData collection was halted prematurely on March 15, 2020 when the University of Michigan stopped all projects that involved face-to-face data collection because of COVID-19 concerns. This resulted in a 2020 sample size about 25% the size of a regular data collection.\nGuidance for combining grades for analysis: see Appendix C of the codebook.\nInformation about potential mode effects for questions on student attitudes and beliefs when comparing previous years' paper-based survey responses to the current tablet method of collection. Please see the codebook Introduction - Survey Mode section for details.\n","dateModified":"Tue Oct 26 08:34:05 EDT 2021","spatialCoverage":"United States","distribution":["contentURL":" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1","@type":"DataDownload","encodingFormat":"application/zip","fileFormat":"SAS","contentURL":" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1","@type":"DataDownload","encodingFormat":"application/zip","fileFormat":"SPSS","contentURL":" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1","@type":"DataDownload","encodingFormat":"application/zip","fileFormat":"Stata","contentURL":" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1","@type":"DataDownload","encodingFormat":"application/zip","fileFormat":"ASCII","contentURL":" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1","@type":"DataDownload","encodingFormat":"application/zip","fileFormat":"R","contentURL":" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1","@type":"DataDownload","encodingFormat":"application/zip","fileFormat":"Delimited"],"@context":" ","version":"V1","url":" ","datePublished":"Tue Oct 26 08:34:05 EDT 2021","license":" ","dateCreated":"2021-10-26 08:34:05.0","temporalCoverage":["2020"],"name":"Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of American Youth (12th-Grade Survey), 2020","publisher":"@type":"Organization","name":"Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor]","alternateName":"ICPSR","url":" "}function modalCloseHandler(helpTerm,elem) $('#helpViewDivId').unbind('hidden.bs.modal');$('#helpViewDivId').on('hidden.bs.modal', function (e) $(elem).focus(););function displayHelp(helpTerm,elem)ReactDOM.render(React.createElement(HelpViewer, modalId:'helpViewDivId', helpTerm:helpTerm, context:'pcms', application:'icpsr',module:null,appUrl:' '), document.getElementById('helpViewDiv'));$('#helpViewDivId').on('shown.bs.modal', function (e) $('#helpViewDivId .modal-header .close').focus(); modalCloseHandler(helpTerm,elem););$('#helpViewDivId').modal('show');function displayPlainHelp(helpTerm,elem)ReactDOM.render(React.createElement(getHelpText, helpTerm:helpTerm, context:'pcms', application:'icpsr',module:null,appUrl:' '), document.getElementById('citation-help-text'));$("#data-doc").treetable( expandable: true );$(function () $('[data-toggle="popover"]').popover(););$(document).ready(function(e)var variables = ;variables.tab = "datadocumentation";variables.studyId = "38156";variables.size = "0";variables.versionLabel = "V1";variables.publishManagerUrl = " ";variables.childCareUrl = " ";variables.searchServerUrl = " ";variables.bibliographyServerUrl = " ";variables.varsServerUrl = " ";variables.searchConfig = null;variables.searchResults = null;variables.restrictedDataTypes = "idars":false,"useAgreement":false,"restricted":false,"vde":false,"enclave":false;variables.staff = false;variables.currentTenant = "icpsr";variables.currentArchive = "nahdap";variables.studyTenant = "ddf";variables.studyArchive = "NAHDAP";variables.title = "Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of American Youth (12th-Grade Survey), 2020";variables.metadata = "purpose":"","collectionNotes":["This study was conducted by the Survey Research Center, Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan.","To protect the anonymity of respondents, all variables that could be used to identify individuals have been collapsed or recoded in the public use files. These modifications should not affect analytic uses of the public use files.","For 2020, a single codebook containing frequency distributions for all seven datasets is produced. The codebook contains bookmarks to signify the start of each dataset. Otherwise the PDF document is organized in similar fashion to previous years with the front section detailing information about the study's history, purpose, sampling, design, content, and then appendices with a link to publications and information on response rates.","Variables omitted from the Western region\nquestionnaires are noted in the codebook.","A cross-time question index is included with the available documentation for the MTF 12th-grade data. The document is sorted by subject area and covers the time period 1976 to 2020.","Frequency and percentage distributions displayed in the 2020 codebook are unweighted, rather than weighted by variable \"ARCHIVE_WT\" (previously named \"V5\") as they had been in previous years. This change was made to simplify both the production of the codebook and their interpretation by the analyst.","As referenced in the codebook two new PDF documents have been included for download to help provide additional context and understanding to data users. These new documents provided by the Principal Investigators detail changes in 2020 to the questionnaires. One document is organized by form. The other document is organized by change (dropped items, added items, changes to response categories, and changes to the text of the question). Each document covers changes for both the 8th/10th grade and 12th grade data. Therefore, the exact same documents are available for download with the 8th- and 10th-grade data (ICPSR 38189).","MTF does not release detailed geography codes in its public use files because of the disclosure risk it would cause. The MTF sample is drawn to generate representative samples of the four Census Bureau regions of the country (Northeast, Midwest, South, and West), but it does not generate representative samples of smaller geographic areas such as states, counties, or cities. For additional information about data that are withheld from the public use files, please see the study codebook.","The MTF Principal Investigators created a series of dichotomous recodes for 10 substances for the three standard time periods (lifetime, past 12 months, and past 30 days). The substances include tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, LSD, other psychedelics, amphetamines, sedatives/barbiturates, tranquilizers, inhalants, and other narcotics. These variables have been placed at the end of the Core data file (DS1). Each variable has the same name and label as the original, but with the addition of the letter \"D\" at the end of the variable name and the words \"(dichotomous recode)\" included at the end of the variable label. This was only done for the core file.","Using these new dichotomous recode variables ICPSR has created interactive maps to show the weighted response for each dichotomous variable by Census region. To create a map simply select the desired year/grade and question/variable. Then click on \"Go\". The resulting map will rank the regions by color. The Census region with the darkest shade will show the highest frequency of use. A frequency table is also provided. SPECIAL NOTE: Due to the recent update of the NAHDAP website the interactive maps feature is not yet available, but will be soon.","For further information about Monitoring the Future please visit their web site. The site provides links to more publications, press releases, and data findings."],"studyDesign":"A total of 3,770 12th grade students completed a survey in 2020. The number of students completing each form were:\n\nCore Data: 3,770\nForm 1 Data: 640\nForm 2 Data: 622\nForm 3 Data: 650\nForm 4 Data: 598\nForm 5 Data: 617\nForm 6 Data: 643\n\nBeginning in 2020 all students completed the survey via electronic tablet instead of the traditional paper-and-pencil version.\nDue to COVID-19 concerns, data collection was halted prematurely on March 15, 2020, resulting in a sample size that was 25% of a typical sample in regular data collection. Analyses indicated that the curtailed sample did not differ from results in previous years in terms of sociodemographics or prevalence of substances. These findings support the 2020 data as a random sample of what MTF would have collected with a full data collection.","description":"This survey of 12th-grade students is part of a series that\nexplores changes in important values, behaviors, and lifestyle orientations of\ncontemporary American youth. Students are randomly assigned to complete one of\nsix questionnaires, each with a different subset of topical questions, but all\ncontaining a set of \"core\" questions on demographics and drug use.\nThere are about 1,400 variables across the questionnaires. Drugs covered by\nthis survey include tobacco, smokeless tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, hashish,\nprescription medications, over-the-counter medications, LSD, hallucinogens,\namphetamines (stimulants), Ritalin (methylphenidate), barbiturates (tranquilizers), cocaine, crack cocaine, GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate), ecstasy, methamphetamine, and heroin. Other topics include attitudes\ntoward religion, changing roles for women, educational aspirations,\nself-esteem, exposure to drug education, and violence and crime (both in and\nout of school).\nHighlights for 2020:\n\nAll students recorded their survey answers on tablets that the project brought to the schools, preloaded with the MTF surveys.\nData collection was halted prematurely on March 15, 2020 when the University of Michigan stopped all projects that involved face-to-face data collection because of COVID-19 concerns. This resulted in a 2020 sample size about 25% the size of a regular data collection.\nGuidance for combining grades for analysis: see Appendix C of the codebook.\nInformation about potential mode effects for questions on student attitudes and beliefs when comparing previous years' paper-based survey responses to the current tablet method of collection. Please see the codebook Introduction - Survey Mode section for details.\n","jsonld":"\"funder\":[\"@type\":\"Organization\",\"name\":\"United States Department of Health and Human Services. National Institutes of Health. National Institute on Drug Abuse\"],\"identifier\":\" \",\"creator\":[\"affiliation\":[\"University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center\"],\"@type\":\"Person\",\"name\":\"Miech, Richard A.\",\"affiliation\":[\"University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center\"],\"@type\":\"Person\",\"name\":\"Johnston, Lloyd D.\",\"affiliation\":[\"University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center\"],\"@type\":\"Person\",\"name\":\"Bachman, Jerald G.\",\"affiliation\":[\"University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center\"],\"@type\":\"Person\",\"name\":\"O'Malley, Patrick M.\",\"affiliation\":[\"University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center\"],\"@type\":\"Person\",\"name\":\"Schulenberg, John E.\",\"affiliation\":[\"University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center\"],\"@type\":\"Person\",\"name\":\"Patrick, Megan E.\"],\"keywords\":[\"alcohol\",\"attitudes\",\"delinquent behavior\",\"demographic characteristics\",\"drug education\",\"drug use\",\"educational objectives\",\"family relationships\",\"gender roles\",\"high school students\",\"lifestyles\",\"peer influence\",\"prescription drugs\",\"self esteem\",\"substance abuse\",\"technology\",\"tobacco use\",\"vaping\",\"victimization\"],\"citation\":\"Miech, Richard A., Johnston, Lloyd D., Bachman, Jerald G., O\\u2019Malley, Patrick M., Schulenberg, John E., and Patrick, Megan E. Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of American Youth (12th-Grade Survey), 2020. Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor], 2021-10-26. \",\"@type\":\"Dataset\",\"description\":\"This survey of 12th-grade students is part of a series that\\nexplores changes in important values, behaviors, and lifestyle orientations of\\ncontemporary American youth. Students are randomly assigned to complete one of\\nsix questionnaires, each with a different subset of topical questions, but all\\ncontaining a set of \\\"core\\\" questions on demographics and drug use.\\nThere are about 1,400 variables across the questionnaires. Drugs covered by\\nthis survey include tobacco, smokeless tobacco, alcohol, marijuana, hashish,\\nprescription medications, over-the-counter medications, LSD, hallucinogens,\\namphetamines (stimulants), Ritalin (methylphenidate), barbiturates (tranquilizers), cocaine, crack cocaine, GHB (gamma hydroxybutyrate), ecstasy, methamphetamine, and heroin. Other topics include attitudes\\ntoward religion, changing roles for women, educational aspirations,\\nself-esteem, exposure to drug education, and violence and crime (both in and\\nout of school).\\nHighlights for 2020:\\n\\nAll students recorded their survey answers on tablets that the project brought to the schools, preloaded with the MTF surveys.\\nData collection was halted prematurely on March 15, 2020 when the University of Michigan stopped all projects that involved face-to-face data collection because of COVID-19 concerns. This resulted in a 2020 sample size about 25% the size of a regular data collection.\\nGuidance for combining grades for analysis: see Appendix C of the codebook.\\nInformation about potential mode effects for questions on student attitudes and beliefs when comparing previous years' paper-based survey responses to the current tablet method of collection. Please see the codebook Introduction - Survey Mode section for details.\\n\",\"dateModified\":\"Tue Oct 26 08:34:05 EDT 2021\",\"spatialCoverage\":\"United States\",\"distribution\":[\"contentURL\":\" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1\",\"@type\":\"DataDownload\",\"encodingFormat\":\"application/zip\",\"fileFormat\":\"SAS\",\"contentURL\":\" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1\",\"@type\":\"DataDownload\",\"encodingFormat\":\"application/zip\",\"fileFormat\":\"SPSS\",\"contentURL\":\" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1\",\"@type\":\"DataDownload\",\"encodingFormat\":\"application/zip\",\"fileFormat\":\"Stata\",\"contentURL\":\" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1\",\"@type\":\"DataDownload\",\"encodingFormat\":\"application/zip\",\"fileFormat\":\"ASCII\",\"contentURL\":\" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1\",\"@type\":\"DataDownload\",\"encodingFormat\":\"application/zip\",\"fileFormat\":\"R\",\"contentURL\":\" =/pcms/studies/0/3/8/1/38156/V1\",\"@type\":\"DataDownload\",\"encodingFormat\":\"application/zip\",\"fileFormat\":\"Delimited\"],\"@context\":\" \",\"version\":\"V1\",\"url\":\" \",\"datePublished\":\"Tue Oct 26 08:34:05 EDT 2021\",\"license\":\" \",\"dateCreated\":\"2021-10-26 08:34:05.0\",\"temporalCoverage\":[\"2020\"],\"name\":\"Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of American Youth (12th-Grade Survey), 2020\",\"publisher\":\"@type\":\"Organization\",\"name\":\"Inter-university Consortium for Political and Social Research [distributor]\",\"alternateName\":\"ICPSR\",\"url\":\" \"","analysisUnit":["Individual"],"source":"","title":"Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of American Youth (12th-Grade Survey), 2020","sampProc":"A multistage area probability sample design was used involving\nthree selection stages: (1) geographic areas or primary sampling units (PSUs),\n(2) schools (or linked groups of schools) within PSUs, and (3) students within\nsampled schools. Of the 72 PSUs, 8 were selected with certainty, 10 were\nselected with a probability of .50, and the remainder were selected using a\nprobability based on their 2010 Census household count. Generally speaking, in\nschools with more than 350 seniors, a sample of seniors or classes was drawn.\nIn schools with less than 350 seniors, all seniors were asked to participate\nunless logistical challenges required a sample be taken. Each school was asked\nto participate for two years so that each year one-half of the sample would be\nreplaced. Schools refusing participation were replaced with similar schools in\nterms of geographic location, size, and type of school (e.g., public,\nprivate/Catholic, private/non-Catholic). The participation rate among schools\nhas been between 66 and 85 percent since the inception of the study. The total\nsample of 12th graders was divided into 6 subsamples, each to be administered a\ndifferent form of the questionnaire. \"Core\" drug and demographic\nquestions were included in all questionnaire forms.","timeMeth":["Longitudinal: Trend / Repeated Cross-section"],"kindOfData":["survey data"],"keyword":["alcohol","attitudes","delinquent behavior","demographic characteristics","drug education","drug use","educational objectives","family relationships","gender roles","high school students","lifestyles","peer influence","prescription drugs","self esteem","substance abuse","technology","tobacco use","vaping","victimization"],"isReplacedBy":"","publishStatus":"PUBLISHED","creator":["personName":"Miech, Richard A.","display":"Richard A. Miech, University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center","personEmail":"","personOrcid":"","personId":"z62Tb","personLastName":"Miech","personOrgName":["University of Michigan. Institute for Social Research. Survey Research Center"],"personFirstName":"Richard A.","affiliationsDisplay":"University of


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